Cheers for a Better Year

celebration

Held on Feb 1, 2009, thousands of tourists and locals gathered in Manhattan's Chinatown to celebrate the 10th annual Lunar New Year parade, popping streamers along the way.

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Filed under Columbia University, Journalism, New York City, Photography

Dreams for the Underdogs

Kevin Terrell/Getty Images

Source: Kevin Terrell/Getty Images

What an amazing day for sports. Although technically Rafael Nadal‘s five-set victory (7-5, 3-6, 7-6, 3-6, 6-2) over Roger Federer in the Australian Open final was yesterday, I didn’t know who won until this morning. No need to hide here: my heart was racing for Nadal, a true-bred Spanish matador who just doesn’t quit. He punches through and penetrates even the most skilled of enemies, in this case Federer.

Sure, Federer is a great player, very similar to ‘pistol’ Pete Sampras whom I had supported. But for some reason I don’t fancy Federer. He’s not obnoxious enough to warrant a hate squad, yet I think my dislike stems from the way he makes it look too easy to win. When players like Nadal sweat and bleed to conquer, Federer dispatches challenges so quickly it’s almost — like they say — a ‘Federer’ express.

That’s why I support Nadal, because he’s the undying kind. The kind that doesn’t quit even though he may not be the brightest talent nor the biggest mouth.

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Filed under Emo, Opinion, Sports

Security or Surveillance

It's not paranoia if they're really after you

It's not paranoia if they're really after you

Slightly more than 10 years ago, a moderately-received Will Smith movie came to cinema screens. “Enemy of the State” was set in the real world — our world — about whether the government should cross the lines of civil rights and ethics when it comes to national security.

After you’ve watched the movie, it’s clear that its creators leaned towards being the ‘good guys.’ After all, Will Smith’s character survives in the end. But perhaps no one, not even the conservatives or the civil rights activists could predict that three years after the movie aired, national security (or the lack of it) came into intense question with the events of 9/11.

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Filed under Opinion, Television/Movies

The (Almost) American Dream

Living a good life in Ann Arbor

Living a good life in Ann Arbor

For three weeks during the Christmas/New Year’s period, I was only two cows shy of living the American Dream. Sustainable, comfortable house? Check. Roaring roadster on the street? Yup. Alright, so I was also missing the fence, two kids, a dog in addition to my acreage of other calling animals. But I was content, with the best company in the greatest of holiday traditions.

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Filed under Emo, UMich Life

I Issuu You

Publish documents and other prints online for free

Publish documents and other prints online for free

One of the great perks of studying in journalism school is the bright exposure to the Internet’s ever-growing number of digital tentacles, meant to ensnare the globe into a tenable social web. First it was Twitter, and now it’s Issuu. See one of my uploaded documents here.

Offering unlimited online space to host your digital copies of books, magazines and every other kind of document, Issuu is an innovative attempt to tackle the woes of the publishing world. Physical copies of newspapers, magazines and books are increasingly costly to publish, and Issuu is offering a solution.
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Back To The Old

If a leopard never changes its spots, maybe a dragon never chages its scales. From this short BBC article, it looks like China is once again clamping down on her people’s access rights.

Just a few months ago during the Olympic frenzy, China had reportedly eased restrictions for journalists. Now with those barriers back up, China wants to raise cyber-blocks as well. It’s hard to feel anger towards the Chinese government, because it’s almost expected of them.

But it makes the Chinese people almost a pitiful figure, when “China believes it has a duty to protect public morality.” Can a selected group — even the most elite — decide the morals of a billion people?

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Tweeting Ted

Twitter is rising in fame. Think Facebook's 'status update' on overdrive.

Twitter is rising in fame. Think Facebook's 'status update' on overdrive.

When it comes to trends, I’ve always known to be on the tail end. Twitter has been around since March 2006, and despite all the pokes and points from Columbia Journalism School’s faculty to get on the tweeting bandwagon, my rebellious heart refused to adopt the new and strange.

Twittering involves short 140-character messages posted on your profile page. Unlike facebook’s ‘status updates,’ Twitter allows any one with an internet connection to ‘follow’ your updates. Some use it as an RSS feed — such as ‘experiments with spaghetti recipes,’ for example — while others use it as a big, flung-open window into their lives.

In short, Twitter can be irritatingly mundance, or feverishly addictive.

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